Aeration

Core Aeration


Breathe new life into your lawn’s roots!

  • Why does my lawn need core aeration?
  • Compacted Georgia clay soils impede the movement of air, water and nutrients to the grass roots.
  • Roots require oxygen to grow and to absorb nutrients and water.
  • When compacted, soil contributes to the accumulation of thatch because restricted oxygen levels impair the activity of earthworms and other thatch-decomposing organisms.
  • Thatch accumulates faster on compacted soils and heavy clay soils than on well aerified soils.
  • When thatch depth exceeds 1/2” it becomes a problem, reducing water movement and encouraging shallow, weak root systems. Thick thatch also can become a home for insects and disease.
  • Many people complain about moss growing in their lawns in Atlanta. Lawns that drain poorly due to soil compaction are displaying a “Moss Welcome” sign.
aeration

How core aeration strengthens your lawn...

aeration

How does core aeration work?

  • Core aeration involves the removal of small soil plugs or cores out of the lawn. Known as a core aerator, the machine extracts 1/2 to 3/4 inch diameter cores of soil and deposits them on your lawn. Aeration holes are typically 1-3 inches deep and 2-6 inches apart.
  • Core aeration is a recommended yearly lawn care practice to control thatch buildup, especially on compacted, heavily used turf. How will my lawn benefit from core aeration?
  • Compacted soil will be loosened, increasing the availability of water and nutrients.
  • Oxygen levels in the soil will be enhanced, stimulating root growth and enhancing the activity of thatch-decomposing organisms.
  • Your lawn’s drought tolerance and overall health will be improved.
  • Your turf will produce new shoots and roots that “fill up” the holes from core aeration, increasing its density.
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